Founding Fathers Blog

Liberty or Not — That is the Question

May 17th, 2010

When any attention is paid to our nation’s founding documents, much attention is paid to the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution, especially to the phrase “promote the general Welfare.” It seems to me that too little attention is paid to the words immediately following that phrase.  The words “and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity” perhaps currently need much more attention by the citizenry and its representatives.

Are we trying at all to secure the “Blessing of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity” when we go on unbridled spending sprees? Are we selling our Liberty for a mess of pottage? Are we purchasing our security for a loss of our Liberty, our Liberty and that of our children?

Instead of binding our Liberty with the chains of massive debt in exchange for some security, shouldn’t we be binding our representatives with the chains of the Constitution?

Support candidates and propositions of either political party. But be sure to choose men and women who are aware of the great dangers inherent in massive spending. Choose those who are truly dedicated to the Freedoms and Liberties for ourselves and our children as protected by the Constitution in the tradition of our Founding Fathers.

Those we select to represent us should be required to pledge a sincere allegiance to the cause of Liberty–a Liberty which aims at the preservation of both personal and property rights.

Some may say that the Constitution should change with the times. Experience has proved that the principles of the Constitution are sound. They are tested by time. They are still sound today. They have an impressive track record. Our Constitution is the oldest governing document in the world. It has created a country with unmatched Liberty, Freedom, growth, and prosperity.

 James Madison is called the “Father of the Constitution.” It is a title he strongly deserved. In the amazing time that reached from the Annapolis Convention (September 1786) to the ratification by Virginia (June 1788) he sheparded the acceptance of the Constitution by the citizens of the Nation and their leaders.  He defended the call to the Constitutional Convention in Congress, and persuaded George Washington to attend it.

Madison did his extensive research into the nature of governments and confederacies to determine a plan. He drafted the Virginia Plan, which became the basis for the Constitution. He played a key and indispensible role in transforming that plan into the finished draft. He argued in defense of drafting the Constitution in the “Federalist Papers.”

He went to Richmond, Virginia, to debate Patrick Henry (of “Give me liberty, or give me death” fame), who was opposed to its ratification. Although Henry was a more polished orator, Madison was well-founded in the principles of government and governing documents. Madison prevailed over Henry and won his States ratification.

Madison later wrote: “The principles and modes of government are too important to be disregarded by an inquisitive mind, and I think are well worthy of a critical examination by all . . .”

Let us give our choices and the words “and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity” our critical examination.

2 Comments

  1. “Instead of binding our Liberty with the chains of massive debt in exchange for some security, shouldn’t we be binding our representatives with the chains of the Constitution?” YES!!

    So well said. Thank you for putting it all in this perspective. When they wrote “common welfare” I am sure they were not envisioning the welfare state of the 21st century!

    I am sending a copy of the oath of office to each of my representatives and senators for them to sign. I think they may have forgotten they raised their hand to the square and swore an oath before they took their position. Chain them to the Constitution!

    Comment by Melinda Sandberg — May 17, 2010 @ 11:52 pm

  2. thanks for those kind words

    Comment by Steven W. Allen — May 19, 2010 @ 10:22 pm

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Powered by WordPress Design by allmp3links